Skip Navigation

5 Nature Walks to Include in your Camping Trip

When life gets busy, and the demands of busy work and home life start to take their toll, there is no better way to relax than to get back to nature and take a long, relaxing walk. Nature has always been an integral part of camping, and in the UK, we are spoilt for choice when choosing a picturesque location for a camping trip. Most campsites in the UK are located not far from some beautiful walks that you can make the most of on your next camping trip in the UK.

Hiking is a major element of a camping and caravanning holiday for many of us. It's the one time we really get the chance to take a moment to stop and appreciate the world without the everyday stresses and strains we usually have to worry about. We are fortunate in the UK to have so many beautiful places and walks to choose from. Whether you enjoy hill walking, a gentle stroll through rolling hills, a city exploration or a walk by the water, the UK has you covered with plenty of walks available for all ages, abilities and preferences.

Walking boots

Here are five nature walks that are well worth including in your next camping trip in the UK.

Walking in the Lake District - Cat Bells Walk

The Lake District is a stunning area. It is one of the firm favourites for campers to visit, especially those who love making the most of nature. Rolling hills and large lakes provide a beautiful backdrop to your camping holiday, and it is difficult not to relax and be impressed by the sublime scenery surrounding you.

There are many trails to choose from across the Lake District, suitable for all ages and abilities. If you want to look at other options, visit the Lake District website.

One walk that we love is Cat Bells Walk in Keswick. This walk is approximately 3.5 miles long and is suitable for anyone with a moderate fitness level. It's a good starter hill climb walk for beginners, although you may need to take it slow in places if you are taking younger children with you. You start the walk at Hawes End, where there is a car park for you to park in. The walk then takes you up Cat Bells Hill, which might only be a hill, but for those new to hill walking, it may feel like a mountain! You can enjoy stunning views over Keswick and Derwent Water at the summit.

For further information on this walk, take a look here. If you want to stay in the area, there are plenty of beautiful campsites in Cumbria.

Catbells, Lake District
Catbells, Lake District

Mountain Walking in Snowdonia - Llanberis Pass

For a nature walking holiday in North Wales, you can't get much more well-known than the famous walk up Mount Snowdon. Llanberis pass is the most popular walk to take up this iconic mountain, and while it might be a little busy at times, it is still a fantastic way to conquer this mountain and see some stunning views.

The Llanberis Pass walk is the longest route to take up to the summit of Snowdon, but the benefit is that it's a gentler climb than the shorter, steeper routes. You spend much of the time walking alongside the mountain railway, and in between trams, you can spend time taking in the view. If you are lucky, you might even spot some mountain sheep and goats grazing on the mountainside.

The walk is not easy, and it isn't recommended for anyone new to hill and mountain climbing. This strenuous walk should take approximately six hours, and you need to take care of the weather and take all necessary safety precautions. Plenty of parking is available in Llanberis, but you need to get there early because they fill up quickly. Check the Snowdonia government website for further information on this walk and others in the area.

Snowdonia and Mount Snowdon are easily accessible as a day trip from most places in North Wales. You can choose your perfect campsite or caravan park here and make the most of everything this beautiful area offers.

The Llanberis Pass, Snowdonia
The Llanberis Pass, Snowdonia

Discover Devon - Bowermans Nose Walk, Dartmoor

Devon is a popular place to visit, and it is easy to see why. There are some stunning coastlines and many rolling hills to explore, not to mention the picturesque seaside and countryside towns and villages.

Bowermans Nose Walk is just one of the iconic walks available in Devon. This walk takes you through the beautiful countryside until you get to the legendary Bowermans Nose column. It is thought that this area is the inspiration for the famous Sherlock Holmes book The Hound of the Baskervilles.

Bowerman's Nose is an intriguing stack of boulders. The column has some interesting legends surrounding its origin and uses.

As the legend goes, a huntsman named Bowerman put on his cap and went out hunting. Along the way, he stumbled across a coven of witches, interrupting their ceremony. As punishment, the witches turned him and his hunting dogs into stone.

You start in the Haytor National Park car park in Islington, walk up to the Bowermans Nose, and then circle back to the car park. The walk is a long walk at over 17km, so it isn't one for the faint-hearted. For further information, The Outdoor Guide has plenty of information and a map you can follow.

Devon is a popular place to camp, and as a result, there are a lot of awesome campsites. No matter where you want to visit, there is a campsite or caravan park perfect for you and your family. Take a look at the options here.

Bowermans Nose, Dartmoor
Bowermans Nose, Dartmoor

Walk Britains Waterways - Worcester and Birmingham Canal Walks

The Worcester and Birmingham Canal Walk is a gentle walk that's a little different. This walk is thirty miles in total, but you can break it up into the sections you want to walk along rather than walk the whole length. The full walk connects Birmingham city centre to the beautiful cathedral city of Worcester. The canal was designed to connect the Midlands to the sea via the Severn, allowing trade by water much easier.

This is an easy walk and perfect for anyone who wants a gentle walk exploring the city and countryside. You have lots of options for where to start and end your walk, so take a look at the Canal and River Trust for more information.

The Midlands is an impressive place to camp, and although it may not be quite as popular as some of the more iconic camping destinations, this area has a lot to offer in terms of exciting attractions and fantastic campsites.

Worcester & Birmingham Canal walk, Midlands
Worcester & Birmingham Canal walk, Midlands

Stunning Scotland - Arthur's Seat, Edinburgh

Edinburgh is a beautiful city to visit, and even in the heart of this remarkable city, you can get out of the busy streets and experience some natural peace and quiet. Arthur's Seat is the perfect walk if you are staying in the area. It's a steep hill walk, but once you get to the top, you are in for a treat with stunning views on all sides of Edinburgh and the surrounding area.

Arthur's seat itself was once a volcano, but it is most famous for the legend surrounding it. Arthur's seat is thought to be one of the many possible locations for the legendary Camelot, where King Arthur and his Knights sat around the iconic round table to carry out their work. Whilst this is just one of the possible locations, it is easy to believe that any King would make this beautiful and ancient group of hills his home and build a castle here.

Arthur's Seat, Edinburgh
Arthur's Seat, Edinburgh

The walk is busy and demanding, so get ready for a lot of steep hillwalking. It may not be suitable for those who are not used to hill walking, but it is worth the effort if you are able. It is a shorter walk over just a little over 5km, making it the perfect hike for a sunny day trip into the hills around Edinburgh. For a map and further information, take a look at the Walk Highlands Website.

Useful information

If you're thinking about wild camping, you may want to give our Wild Camping articles a read

For walking, trekking and hiking, we recommend using the OS Maps app. Find out more

Want to learn more about how nature benefits you? Visit our Mental Wellbeing Hub