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UNESCO: France

France is full of rich historical sights, awe-inspiring cultural spots and lush natural spaces.

France currently has 49 sites which have been given UNESCO status, and of these, 47 are in mainland France, the remainder are in New Caledonia and Réunion.

There are some impressive places on the list, as you can well imagine, such as Chatres Cathedral, the Palace of Versailles and the fortified city of Carcassone. So why not plan your next trip across the Channel to visit some of these sites, they’ve been given this status for a reason, so you know you’re in for a treat!

Visit our UNESCO Hub page for other European regions.

Abbey Church of Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe

Abbey Church of Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe
Abbey Church of Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe

Abbey Church of Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe (cultural, 1983)
Nouvelle-Aquitaine [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Located in Poitou-Charentes, this Abbey Church was built in the 11th Century. It’s an amazing example of Romanesque religious architecture, leading it to be called the ‘Romanesque Sistine Chapel’. It’s famed for its incredible 11th and 12th Century murals which are housed in the abbey, and in the crypt below. They cover several hundred square metres of the interior and depict biblical stories from the Old Testament, such as the story of Cain and Abel, Adam and Eve and Noah and the Arc.

The stone spire which is over 80 metres high was added in the 14th century, and the church itself is over 40 metres long.

Cistercian Abbey of Fontenay

Cistercian Abbey of Fontenay
Cistercian Abbey of Fontenay

Cistercian Abbey of Fontenay (cultural, 1981)
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

The Abbey is the oldest preserved Cistercian Abbeys in the world. It’s located in the commune of Marmagne in Burgundy. It was founded in 1118 by Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, who was a high profile French saint, and is a fine example of the Romanesque period. Sights to see include the Church itself, the Dormitory, Cloister, Chapter Room, Common Room and the Forge. The Abbey is nestled within landscaped gardens, which has also been granted with many different awards and statuses. The Abbey is privately owned, and has been in the same family since 1820.

Arles, Roman and Romanesque Monuments

Arles, Roman and Romanesque Monuments
Arles, Roman and Romanesque Monuments

Arles, Roman and Romanesque Monuments (cultural, 1981)
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

The city centre of Arles contains a collection of Roman monuments, which date back as early as the 1st Century BC. Visitors to the area will be able to see an amphitheatre, a Roman theatre, a Forum, Baths, subterranean galleries, courtyard and necropolis. These monuments were evidence of the popularity of Arles throughout the centuries and its status as an important city. Its city walls also contain the Church of Saint-Trophime and its cloister, which is said to be one of Provence’s finest examples of a Romanesque monument .

Vézelay, Church and Hill

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Vézelay, Church and Hill (cultural, 1979)
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Located in northern Burgundy, Vézelay is a beautiful village which plays host to a Benedictine Abbey – the Abbey of St Mary Magdalene. The village is also the start of one of the four major pilgrim routes in France and Richard the Lionheart and Phillippe Auguste set out on the 3rd Crusade from Vézelay. The Abbey is located at the top of a hill which the village forms around. Relics of St Mary Magdalene can be seen within the Church. The Church was built with the alignment with the sun and at midday of the summer solstice, the light comes through the windows and creates an incredible precise pattern on the floor of the nave.

Belfries of Belgium and France

Belfries of Belgium and France
Belfries of Belgium and France

Belfries of Belgium and France (cultural, 1999)
Hauts-de-France [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

This would take a lot of visiting! This UNESCO World Heritage site is actually made up of 56 individual buildings and their bell towers, representations of civil liberty in Flanders and the Duchy of Burgundy.

Originally, there was a list of 32 belfry towers in Flanders and Wallonia, and then in 2005, 23 other belfries were added from Nord-Pas-de-Calais and Picardy regions. Some church towers are also included on this list as at some point in history, they were used as watch towers or alarm bells.

Bordeaux, Port of the Moon

Bordeaux, Port of the Moon
Bordeaux, Port of the Moon

Bordeaux, Port of the Moon (cultural, 2007)
Nouvelle-Aquitaine [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Part of the port city of Bordeaux is called the Port of the Moon, because of the crescent shape bend formed by the Garonne and a strip of land along the bank. This area within Bordeaux was designated as a UNESCO Heritage site because of its ‘outstanding urban and architectural ensemble’ of the 18th century. It’s one of the first French cities to be urbanised. Overall, Bordeaux has the highest number of preserved historical buildings in France outside of Paris.

Canal du Midi

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Canal du Midi (cultural, 1996)
Occitanie [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Canal du Midi is a 241 km long canal in Southern France, linking the Mediterranean and the Atlantic. It was built between 1667 and 1694 and is celebrated for its civil engineering skills, it was one of its kind in the 17th Century. The canal starts in the city of Toulouse and winds its way down to the Étang de Thau on the Mediterranean. It’s one of the oldest canals still in operation in Europe.

Amiens Cathedral

Amiens Cathedral
Amiens Cathedral

Amiens Cathedral (cultural, 1981)
Hauts-de-France [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Amiens Cathedral overlooks the River Somme and is one of the largest 13th century Gothic cathedrals in France. It’s the tallest complete Roman Catholic cathedral in the country, as its nave reaches over 42 metres high.

It was built between 1220 and 1270, and is renowned for its ornate Gothic sculptures giving it an impressive façade. Inside, the cathedral boast 126 pillars, giving it the title of largest medieval interior in Western Europe. Truly a cathedral of firsts, largests and tallests!

Bourges Cathedral

Bourges Cathedral
Bourges Cathedral

Bourges Cathedral (cultural, 1992)
Centre-Val de Loire [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

The Roman Catholic Cathedral of St Etienne is dedicated to Saint Stephen. The present cathedral was built as a replacement for a structure which was built in the 11th Century. There are still traces of this building in the crypt. Work probably began on this structure in the 12th Century. Its French Gothic style has remained fairly intact over the year, more so than other cathedrals built around this time. Visitors to the cathedral marvel at its architecture and the Cathedral is still surrounded by medieval timber houses of the town of Bourges. It’s a truly unique cathedral that was ahead of its time.

Chartres Cathedral

Chartres Cathedral
Chartres Cathedral

Chartres Cathedral (cultural, 1979)
Centre-Val de Loire [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

val cathedral and another example of fine Gothic architecture. Construction began in the 12th Century, and much of its original stained glass windows still remains. The main attraction of the Cathedral has drawn many visitors over the years, and it’s a must-see for Christian pilgrims because of its famous relic.

Called the Sancta Camisa, it’s said to be the tunic worn by the Virgin Mary when she gave birth to Jesus.

The Cathedral is easily identified by its two differing spires one from the 12th Century, and one from the 16th Century. In addition, all around the outside can be seen hundreds of sculpted figures, which depict a variety of stories along a number of themes.

Cathedral of Notre-Dame, Former Abbey of Saint-Remi, and Palace of Tau, Reims

Former Abbey of Saint-Remi
Former Abbey of Saint-Remi

Cathedral of Notre-Dame, Former Abbey of Saint-Remi, and Palace of Tau, Reims (cultural, 1991)
Grand Est | Cathedral of Notre-Dame [Wikipedia link] Former Abbey of Saint-Remi [Wikipedia link] Palace of Tau [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

The Cathedral in Reims is important in that it was the place where French Kings were crowned. The present building replaced a much older structure which was destroyed by fire in the 13th Century, which originally itself was on the site of some Roman baths. During the First World War, the Cathedral was used as a hospital, before a large proportion was destroyed in the bombing.

The Abbey of Saint-Remi was founded in the 6th Century. The remains of Saint Remi are conserved there, and have been so since the 11th Century.

The Palace of Tau was the palace of the Archbishop of Reims, and displays many objects from the cathedral as well as those associated with the coronations of the Kings of France.

The Causses and the Cévennes, Mediterranean agro-pastoral Cultural Landscape

The Causses and the Cévennes
The Causses and the Cévennes

The Causses and the Cévennes, Mediterranean agro-pastoral Cultural Landscape (cultural, 2011)
Occitanie [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

These mountainous landscapes were awarded UNESCO heritage status as it reflects a period of almost 3000 years of pastoral history. The landscape has evolved with the development of pastoral techniques and some of the traditional techniques that were practiced here many years ago are still present today. It’s an amazing example of how nature and human activities have existed and developed together over hundreds of years.

Historical centre of Avignon: Papal Palace, Episcopal Ensemble and Avignon Bridge

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Historical centre of Avignon: Papal Palace, Episcopal Ensemble and Avignon Bridge (cultural, 1995)
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Avignon has an important place in French history, in the 14th Century it was the seat of the papacy and seven Popes resided here. The centre of the town plays homage to this, with many historical monuments, such as the Papal Palace and the unfinished Bridge of Avignon. Avignon officially became part of France during the French Revolution. It’s one of the few cities to have preserved medieval ramparts. Today the town also plays host to a famous festival, which brings tourists from all over the world to visit.

Routes of Santiago de Compostela in France

Routes of Santiago de Compostela in France
Routes of Santiago de Compostela in France

Routes of Santiago de Compostela in France (cultural, 1998)
Several sites [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

The Santiago de Compostela is an important pilgrimage route, which passed through many regions of France as pilgrims made their way to Santiago de Compostela in Spain. Along the route were numerous structures which provided services to the travelling pilgrims, such as monuments, churches, even a city gate and a bridge.

Collectively, it is these constructions which were given UNESCO heritage status, there are 78 in all, with some of them being places pilgrims would travel to in their own right. The structures are a testament to the Christian religion and have important religious and historical significance.

Episcopal City of Albi

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Episcopal City of Albi (cultural, 2010)
Occitanie [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Located on the River Tarn, the city was given World Heritage Status because of its rich architectural heritage. The Cathedral and surrounding episcopal buildings are built using red brick and red tiles, and are easily recognised by these features. Visitors to the city should visit the Old Bridge, which has and still is used, after almost 1000 years. It has 8 arches, and in the 14th Century was fortified with a drawbridge. The Bishops Palace is one of France's oldest and most complete castles. The cathedral too is a sight to see, and the collection of buildings have not changed much over the years, and it is this which has been given the importance of preservation for future generations.

From the Great Saltworks of Salins-les-Bains to the Royal Saltworks of Arc-et-Senans, the Production of Open-pan Salt

Great Saltworks of Salins-les-Bains
Great Saltworks of Salins-les-Bains

From the Great Saltworks of Salins-les-Bains to the Royal Saltworks of Arc-et-Senans, the Production of Open-pan Salt (cultural, 2008)
Several sites [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

The Royal Saltworks was built in 1775 by Claude-Nicolas Ledoux, a prominent Parisian architect. The extraction of salt in this area started in the Middle Ages, and continued right up until 1895. The building broke the mould in terms of design and architecture, and was even signed off by Louis XV. Today, the building houses exhibitions and details of other similar design projects.

Fortifications of Vauban

Fortifications of Vauban
Fortifications of Vauban

Fortifications of Vauban (cultural, 2011)
Occitanie [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Vauban was a military engineer, and he advised Louis XIV on making France’s borders more defensible. To that end, he designed a number of fortifications along the Northern, Western and Eastern borders – 12 were included when UNESCO classified them into a World Heritage Site. The towns were all built from scratch during the 17th Century, and features includes citadels and city walls, towers and châteaux, watchtowers and forts. Examples of fortifications included in this classification include the citadels of Arras and Besançon, Doubs.

Jurisdiction of Saint-Émilion

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Jurisdiction of Saint-Émilion (cultural, 2008)
Nouvelle-Aquitaine [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Saint-Émilion was named after the monk Émilion, a travelling confessor who settled in a hermitage carved into the rock. The village is on the Santiago de Compostela route, so it was popular with pilgrims. Monks followed Émilion to the village, and it was them who began the commercial wine production that it is still known for today. The village boasts a beautiful Romanesque church and also a monolithic church which is carved from a limestone cliff.

Romans planted vineyards in Saint-Émilion as early as the 2nd Century, and of course, vineyards still dominate the region today. Saint-Émilion became a jurisdiction during a period of English rule in the 12th Century.

The village was so strapped for cash, that in 2011, it was forced to sell the medieval monument Cordeliers Cloisters to the vice president of the Bordeaux Chamber of Commerce.

Le Havre, the City Rebuilt by Auguste Perret

Le Havre
Le Havre

Le Havre, the City Rebuilt by Auguste Perret (cultural, 2005)
Normandy [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Le Havre is the second biggest port in France after Marseille, and is the biggest container port. It’s location in North West France led to it being heavily bombed in the Second World War, to the extent that the whole city needed to be rebuilt. Step in Auguste Perret who was tasked with just that job. His material of choice was concrete, and he started from scratch by clearing any old structures that were remaining. His plans were widely celebrated as being able to maintain the former layout, but bringing it into the 20th Century. The reconstruction work was completed in the 1960s. It is only one of a few modern sites in Europe given World Heritage status, and was granted this because of the ‘innovative utilisation of concrete’s potential.’

Mont Saint-Michel and its Bay

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Mont Saint-Michel and its Bay (cultural, 1979)
Normandy [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

An island commune in Normandy, it is a sight which has become familiar to tourists as one of France’s most recognisable landmarks. It rests just 600 metres from the mainland, and was only accessible at low tide before a new bridge was built to connect it to the mainland in 2014. Interestingly, the island is constructed on a hierarchical system, so at the top is the abbey and monastery, then great halls, storage and housing, and then outside the walls was the accommodation for fisherman and farmers.

Because of its position, and the fact that at high tide, it is unreachable, it was used as a place of fortification from ancient times. It has been a garrison and even a prison. The site was awarded World Heritage status not only because of its unusual natural features, but also its historical and architectural significance.

Palace and Park of Fontainebleau

Chateau Fontainebleau
Chateau Fontainebleau

Palace and Park of Fontainebleau (cultural, 1981)
Île-de-France [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

One of the largest Royal Châteaux, Fontainebleau was originally a medieval palace before becoming a château. It has been the residence of many of France’s kings, and even Napoleon relocated the throne here before he was finally exiled. It was given its name due to one of the springs that were found in the grounds. Its location in relation to Paris and the abundance of game in the surrounding forest is one of the reasons it became so popular with French monarchs.

Over the years, many additions and extensions were made to the château, which is why it is so large now. It has served as a military school, prison and an art and music school during its time. It was occupied by the Germans during the war and even became a headquarters for NATO. Visitors can see Marie Antionette’s bedroom, the Throne Room, Napoleon’s Apartments and the Pope’s Apartment. The gardens and parks are also included in the World Heritage status due to their impressive nature.

Palace and Park of Versailles

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Palace and Park of Versailles (cultural, 1979)
Île-de-France [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Versailles was originally a small village which dates from the 11th century; now, it has been swallowed up by the suburb of Paris. The Palace itself was built as a hunting lodge by Louis XIII in 1623 before being turned into a Royal Palace by Louis XIV. In 1682, the Palace was fit enough for Louis XIV to move the royal court from Paris, and it remained as such until the French Revolution when the Royal family were forced to return to Paris.

Following the Revolution and the fall of the monarchy, Versailles fell into disrepair. Some work was done to try and restore the Palace by Napoleon and Louis XVIII, Louis-Phillippe turned the Palace into a museum of French history in the mid-19th Century and continued the work to bring it back to its former glory. Primarily a museum and tourist attraction, it is still used for political and ceremonial functions.

Paris, Banks of the Seine

Paris, Banks of the Seine
Paris, Banks of the Seine

Paris, Banks of the Seine (cultural, 1991)
Île-de-France [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

The banks of the River Seine which runs through the heart of Paris contain many of Paris’ famous landmarks, including the Louvre, Notre-Dame Cathedral and the Eiffel Tower. There are 37 bridges which cross the river through Paris including the Pont Neuf which dates back to 1607. It’s called the Seine after the Roman Goddess of the River, Sequana. Each bank has a name, Rive Gauche and Rive Driote, and both of them have been given World Heritage Status. They are a popular attraction for tourists to walk along and take in all the sights of Paris.

Place Stanislas, Place de la Carrière, and Place d'Alliance in Nancy

Place Stanislas
Place Stanislas

Place Stanislas, Place de la Carrière, and Place d'Alliance in Nancy (cultural, 1983)
Grand Est | Place Stanislas [Wikipedia link] Place de la Carrière [Wikipedia link] Place d'Alliance [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Nancy is a city in North Eastern France, and was the capital of the Duchy of Lorraine. Place Stanislas is a large square built in the 18th Century by Stanislaus I of Poland, and links the old town of Nancy to the new town, which was created by Charles III.

Two other squares, Place de la Carrière and Place d'Alliance were also given Heritage status along with Place Stanislas.

Place de la Carrière is renowned for its 18th century architecture and Place d’Alliance is the smallest of the three, and was listed for its art, peace and refinement.

Pont du Gard Aqueduct

Pont du Gard Aqueduct
Pont du Gard Aqueduct

Pont du Gard Aqueduct (cultural, 1985)
Occitanie [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

An ancient Roman bridge that crosses the Gardon river and is part of the Nîmes Roman aqueduct. What’s unusual about this bridge is that it has three tiers of arches, and is the highest of all elevated Roman aqueducts, and one of the best preserved. The aqueduct itself was used to take water to the homes in Nîmes and transported about 44,000,000 gallons of water a day, up until around the 6th Century.

After the aqueduct fell into disuse, the Pont du Gard remained intact, most likely because it was also used as a toll bridge. After some hundreds of years, the bridge suffered with wear and tear, and restorations were undertaken. Traffic can no longer use the bridge, and visitors are directed towards a visitor’s centre to learn more about the bridge and its history. It was named as a Heritage Site due to its rareness and therefore historical significance.

Provins, Town of Medieval Fairs

Provins
Provins

Provins, Town of Medieval Fairs (cultural, 2001)
Île-de-France [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Provins is a medieval fortified town with many interesting aspects to its history and features. For example, it was the home of one of the Champagne fairs, which were so important to the economy in medieval times, when the city was under the protection of Counts of Champagne. It has well preserved city walls, and even two sets of caves under the town! One set contains Bronze and Iron Age graffiti and the other was used for storage. Visitors to Provins will notice lots of roses, as it is famous for its rose cultivation, particularly rose petal jam, rose honey and rose candy.

Historic site of Lyon

Historic site of Lyon
Historic site of Lyon

Historic site of Lyon (cultural, 1998)
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

France’s third largest city, it was founded in the 1st Century BC by the Romans. It has links with cinema, the cinematographe was invented here. It’s also known for its Festival of Lights, which happens every December. As such, Lyon is known as the Capital of Lights.

Visitors to the city will be able to get a good meal, as Lyon is well known for its gastronomy, but actually, Lyon was awarded World Heritage status for its historical and architectural importance, including in the production and weaving of silk. Nowadays, it has a reputation for innovation and fostering start-ups.

Visitors should see the Fourvière Basilica, Roman ruins and amphitheatre, Parc de la Tête d’Or and Musée des Beaux Arts de Lyon.

Prehistoric Sites and Decorated Caves of the Vézère Valley

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Prehistoric Sites and Decorated Caves of the Vézère Valley (cultural, 1979)
Nouvelle-Aquitaine [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

The Valley contains 147 pre-historic sites, phew! The sites include the world-famous Lascaux caves which were discovered in 1940. These caves revealed numerous Paleolithic cave paintings believed to be over 17,000 years old.

Most of the images are of large animals and are extremely important to the archaeological world. Among the discovery of cave paintings, the Valley also revealed hominid remains, which have been studied by anthropologists the world over.

Strasbourg – From the Grande Île to the Neustadt

Strasbourg – From the Grande Île to the Neustadt
Strasbourg – From the Grande Île to the Neustadt

Strasbourg – From the Grande Île to the Neustadt (cultural, 1988)
Grand Est [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

The Large Island lies in the centre of Strasbourg. On one side is the Ill river and the other is the Canal du Faux-Rempart. It’s only ¾ mile by ½ mile and at the centre is the city’s square, Place Kléber. Visitors can also see Strasbourg’s Cathedral, which is built with reddish stone and as well as the Rohan palace and several other ancient churches. One of the main tourist attractions can be seen here too, called Petit France, where the city’s tanners, millers and fishermen previously lived. To mark the fact that the Grande Île was awarded Heritage Status, 22 brass plates were placed on the bridges which give access to the island.

UPDATE: In July 2017 the Grande Île UNESCO Site was extended. The extension concerns the Neustadt, new town, designed and built under the German administration (1871-1918). The Neustadt draws the inspiration for its urban layout from the Haussmannian model, while adopting a Germanic architectural idiom for its edifices. This dual influence has enabled the creation of an urban space that is specific to Strasbourg, where the perspectives created around the cathedral open to a unified landscape around the rivers and canals.

Roman Theatre and its Surroundings and the "Triumphal Arch" of Orange

The Triumphal Arch of Orange
The Triumphal Arch of Orange

Roman Theatre and its Surroundings and the "Triumphal Arch" of Orange (cultural, 1981)
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

One of the best preserved Roman Theatres it was built in the 1st Century, and is still used today to host Orange’s summer opera festival. It was used as a defensive post in the Middle Ages, and also a refuge for townspeople in the 16th Century during religious wars.

The Triumphal Arch, also found in Orange thought to have been built during the reign of Augustus. It’s decorated with many naval themes and scenes of battles. The Arch stands at the northern entry point to the town, and was built into the town’s walling.

The Loire Valley between Sully-sur-Loire and Chalonnes

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The Loire Valley between Sully-sur-Loire and Chalonnes (cultural, 2000)
Centre-Val de Loire/Pays de la Loire [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

The Loire Valley stretches for 280km and is situated bang smack in the middle of the Loire River. It is lush and splendid, full of vineyards and orchards. As well as being famous for its wines, the whole area includes amazing architecture and important towns. It has been inhabited since the Paleolithic period. Of course, there is no possible way you can visit the Loire Valley without touring at least one château!

Historic Fortified City of Carcassonne

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Historic Fortified City of Carcassonne (cultural, 1997)
Occitanie [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

One of the finest examples of a medieval walled city, Carcassone is fully enclosed within its ramparts. The site was heavily restored in the 19th century. The Romans first fortified the hilltop around 100BC and it’s been a site of importance ever since. Visitors to the town will be able to see two outer walls and 53 towers. It even has its own drawbridge. A truly stunning site to behold.

Gulf of Porto: Calanche of Piana, Gulf of Girolata, Scandola Reserve

Calanche of Piana
Calanche of Piana

Gulf of Porto: Calanche of Piana, Gulf of Girolata, Scandola Reserve (natural, 1983)
Corsica | Calanche of Piana [Wikipedia link] Scandola Reserve [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Located in Corsica, this nature reserve is part of the Natural Park of Corsica and occupies the Scandola peninsula. The landscape is rugged and plays host to many sheer cliff faces coloured red. Famed for its scrubland vegetation, the waters are crystal clear and marine life occupy the many islets and caves. Seabirds can also be found here. One of the few natural World Heritage sites.

Pyrénées – Mont Perdu

Pyrénées – Mont Perdu
Pyrénées – Mont Perdu

Pyrénées – Mont Perdu (mixed, 1997)
Occitanie [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

The third largest mountain in the Pyrénées, Mont Perdu stands at 3355m high. The summit is actually in Spain and is easier to climb from Spain than it is in France. The summit is hidden from view by the peaks of the Cirques of Gavarnie and Estaubé. Mont Perdu means lost mountain.

Nord-Pas de Calais Mining Basin

Nord-Pas de Calais Mining Basin
Nord-Pas de Calais Mining Basin

Nord-Pas de Calais Mining Basin (cultural, 2012)
Hauts-de-France [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

This site is interesting in that it represents the period of industrialisation in Northern France. The area has been shaped by over three centuries of mining coal beginning in the 18th Century.

There are 109 components to this World Heritage site, and these include slag heaps and mining pits as well as mining villages and transport infrastructure a complete representation of a miner’s life.

Decorated Cave of Pont d’Arc, known as Grotte Chauvet-Pont d’Arc, Ardèche

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Decorated Cave of Pont d’Arc, known as Grotte Chauvet-Pont d’Arc, Ardèche (cultural, 2014)
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

This cave contains the earliest known and best preserved figurative cave paintings in the world. It’s located on a limestone cliff above the former course of the Ardèche river and was only discovered in 1994. Not only were the paintings discovered, but also fossilised remains and animal markings and prints. Also discovered was a child’s footprints, which may be the oldest footprints ever discovered.

The Climats, terroirs of Burgundy

The Climats, terroirs of Burgundy
The Climats, terroirs of Burgundy

The Climats, terroirs of Burgundy (cultural, 2015)
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Just south of Dijon, The Climats refer to a patchwork of vineyard plots that cover the slopes of the Côte de Nuits and the Côte de Beaune. They vary according to specific natural conditions (geology and exposure) as well as vine types. The status also includes the villages and town of Beaune which are central in the production of wine in this area. The centre of Dijon has also been thrown in for good measure here too.

Champagne Hillsides, Houses and Cellar

Champagne Hillsides, Houses and Cellar
Champagne Hillsides, Houses and Cellar

Champagne Hillsides, Houses and Cellars (cultural, 2015)
Grand Est [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

Of course, this wine region is well known for producing sparkling white wine, which can only be called champagne in this region. Grapes grown here include Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier. Sparkling wine has been produced here since the 17th Century. The area comprises three sites - Hautvilliers, Reims and Epernay. The status also includes the hillsides, underground cellars and the Champagne Houses, which complete the whole Champagne process.

Recent Additions

Recent Additions.

Chaine des Puys – Limagne fault tectonic arena (natural, 2018)
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes [Wikipedia] [UNESCO]

Cordouan Lighthouse (cultural, 2021)
Nouvelle-Aquitaine [Wikipedia] [UNESCO]

Nice, Winter Resort Town of the Riviera (cultural, 2021)
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur [Wikipedia] [UNESCO]

Common Sites

Common Site(s) - sites in multiple locations and countries

Great Spa Towns of Europe (cultural, 2021)
Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes [Wikipedia] [UNESCO]

Ancient and Primeval Beech Forests of the Carpathians and Other Regions of Europe (cultural, 2021)
Several sites [Wikipedia] [UNESCO]

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⭐️ The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier, an Outstanding Contribution to the Modern Movement (cultural, 2016)
Several sites [Wikipedia] [UNESCO]

Prehistoric pile dwellings around the Alps (cultural, 2011)
Bourgogne-Franche-Comté/Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes [Wikipedia link] [UNESCO link]

These are a series (well 111) of pre-historic settlements (pile dwellings or stilt houses) that were built from 5000 to 500 BC. The majority of them are located in Switzerland, and only 11 actually appear in France. They will be found on the edge of lakes, wetlands and rivers. Some have been excavated and have revealed a large amount about life in pre-historic times. They are all highly preserved and are an important source for archeological study.


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