AR Guide to: Accessible Travel

Travel advice for those who are less-abled

Articles > Travel Advice Hub > AR Guide to: Accessible Travel

We firmly believe that travel should be accessible to everyone. It's a wonderful thing, to explore a place, to journey somewhere new, to instil a sense of adventure in the little ones, to discover new cultures, to learn, to experience, to stimulate. 

But for some, travel can be challenging. 

We've compiled a guide to accessible travel within Europe, giving each country a rating out of five. We look at accessibility of public buildings and services, transport, street movement, attractions and rural travel, as well as government attitudes towards improvement and legal provisions that protect vulnerable people.

Key

Overall score
This is our overall rating (out of five) taking into account our five-point test.

Overall description
Summarises the accessibility situation.

Government attitudes: Is the government making reasonable efforts to improve accessibility, opportunities and awareness?

Legal provisions: does the country have equality and anti-discrimination laws in place?

Five-point criteria

We've put together a five-point criteria to score each country based on its ability to adapt and improve in five key areas.

Public buildings & services: government buildings, libraries, tourist offices, embassies, schools, national museums and galleries, travel hubs, post offices, religious buildings, police stations, hospitals etc.

Transport: buses, taxis, trains, trams and metro, boat services etc. Disabled car parking spaces and road parking.

Street movement: public spaces, pavements and pedestrianised areas. Street furniture such as benches, planters, market stalls and booths. Geography of the area. Tactile paving, dropped kerbs, level access etc.

Attractions: theme parks, swimming pools and water parks, castles, palaces and historic attractions, natural and outdoor attractions, museums and galleries, zoos etc.

Rural travel: access to out-of-city areas, amenities in isolated regions, travel links etc.

Contents

Austria
Belgium

Croatia

Czech Republic

Denmark

France

Germany

Great Britain

Greece

Ireland

Italy

Luxembourg

Netherlands

Norway

Portugal

Slovenia

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Austria

Austria

Our Accessibility Rating ★★★★

Generally well catered for in cities and larger towns, especially Vienna. Most, but not all, attractions and public services offer assistance.

Government attitudes: Accepting, actively working on improving accessibility.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★★★★
Ramps into public buildings are common but not universal. There is no national organisation for the disabled but regional tourist offices offer help where they can.

Transport ★★★★
Good access via road, rail and air. Facilities are available and accommodations will be made where possible. Low-floor trams and buses. Reduced rates with ID.

Street Movement ★★★★
Accommodations have been made to make sure it is easy to get around within cities. Accessible routes available. Tours are accessible.

Attractions ★★★★
Most attractions in cities are accessible and provide facilities.

Rural Travel ★★★
Outside of the major cities, accessibility is variable.

Belgium

Belgium

Our Accessibility Rating ★★★★

Most public areas and services are suitable for wheelchair users and less able individuals. Transport is well-equipped.

Government attitudes: Very accepting, actively working on improving accessibility and opportunities.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★★★★
The Central Square in Brussels and tours of the area are impossible for those in wheelchairs and those who are less able. Many public buildings in cities are accessible.

Transport ★★★★
Rail travel accommodations are made available wherever possible but cannot be guaranteed. Booking in advance is essential. Reduced rates are available with ID. Metro stations are equipped with lifts and accessibility facilities and assistance staff will help. Buses have low-floors, wide doors and reserved spaces onboard.

Street Movement ★★★★
Tours in major cities are mostly accessible to all. In Brussels, pavements and some roads are cobbled and can be difficult to manoeuver - this is most prevelent in the city centre. Brussels is a hilly city and some areas can be hard to reach. In more modern parts of major cities, kerb cuts and tactile paving are installed.

Attractions ★★★★
Many attractions in major cities have made accommodations for wheelchair users including level access, ramps, lifts and wide doors.

Rural Travel ★★
Caves and castles in rural Wallonia are inaccessible and are unlikely to ever be able to adapt. Other parts of the country are variable. Check before visiting.

Croatia

Croatia

Our Accessibility Rating ★★

Largely unequipped for less-able travellers but improving. Public transport in larger cities is generally good.

Government attitudes: Mostly accepting, laws passed on new building requirements and improvements being made but not actively engaging in improvement.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★★
Local laws mean that most new buildings are required to provide accommodations but do not require the retrofitting of facilities in old buildings so accessibility to these older buildings can be challenging or limited. Public WCs are wheelchair-friendly.

Transport ★★
Accessibility accommodations are not universal and can be limited, especially on rural routes but assistance will sometimes be offered. Bus and train stations in major cities are wheelchair-friendly but ferries are not.

Street Movement ★★
The geography of the country is hilly and access to some parts of the country can be steep and difficult.

Attractions ★★
Easy access is certainly not universal and depends on the type of building or space and the geography surrounding it. Efforts are being made to improve.

Rural Travel 
Outside of urban areas, accessibility worsens significantly.

Czechia

Czech Republic

Our Accessibility Rating ★★

Behind when it comes to accessibility. Older buildings, including museums, are not well equipped. Transport in cities is improving.

Government attitudes: Mostly accepting, laws passed on new building requirements and improvements being made but not actively engaging in improvement.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★★
Historic monuments provide varying accessibility options. Many old buildings including museums are not accessible. But newer buildings are better equipped. Public WCs are mostly wheelchair-friendly, as are restaurant WCs.

Transport ★★
Subway accessibility has improved but gaps still remain. Some buses and trams are equipped to assist disabled travellers but it is not universal.

Street Movement ★★
Although historic, the city of Prague is mostly accessible however cobbled streets and high kerbs could present difficulty

Attractions ★★
Improvements are being made but access is not universal or widespread at present

Rural Travel 
Outside of urban centres, attractions and trails are not accessible and facilities are very limited.

Denmark

Denmark

Our Accessibility Rating ★★

Access to buildings, transport and rural areas is improving but some areas are certainly not universally accessible yet.

Government attitudes: Very accepting, actively working on improving accessibility and opportunities and partnering with private companies to offer widespread facilities.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★★
Public WCs are mostly wheelchair-friendly, there are dedicated disabled WCs dotted around Copenhagen. Reduced rates are available in some museums and galleries with ID.

Transport ★★
Almost all metro stations in Copenhagen are accessible and buses are ramp accessible with assistance. Facilities in other urban areas may be slightly less reliable and rural transport may offer limited facilities.

Street Movement ★★
Outdoor spaces are generally easy to navigate but some historic areas and spaces surrounding older buildings may be challenging for those with wheelchairs.

Attractions ★★
In Copenhagen, the main shopping mall is full accessible. Tourist attractions are not universally accessible so its worth checking ahead of your visit. Participating venues will allow free entry when a Copenhagen Card is presented

Rural Travel (not sufficient information to score)
Rural facilities could be limited. Check before travelling.

Other things worth mentioning
Many state-managed forests and green spaces are accessible and efforts to improve access to natural environments are being made. Beaches are accessible.

France

France

Our Accessibility Rating ★★

Efforts to improve accessibility are being made but the Paris Metro is unusable for wheelchair users.

Government attitudes: Accepting, actively working on improving accessibility.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★★
The Paris tourist office provides excellent information and advice for wheelchair users and those who are less-abled or have other disabilities. Many Parisian buildings are old and can be hard to navigate, although not impossible. Provisions have been made in some buildings. In other major cities, older buildings have the same issue but new buildings have to, by law, provide access to all.

Transport ★★
Whilst access to the Paris metro is impossible for wheelchair users and challenging for those who are less-abled, buses and trams in nearly all major cities are 100% wheelchair-friendly. The national train network is built to accommodate wheelchairs.

Street Movement ★★
Cobbled streets, outdoor pavement seating, lack of dropped kerbs and street furniture can all present problems for those with wheelchairs but improvements are actively being made. In major cities, large open squares and wide streets provide space to manoeuvre. Smaller towns and rural villages will certainly provide challenges with steep climbs, narrow streets and cobbled pavements.

Attractions ★★
As with most public buildings, many attractions are historic and do not provide accessibility options. But newer attractions in major cities and larger towns have made provisions for easy access with ramps, lifts and level flooring.

Rural Travel 
Rural towns and villages are largely inaccessible although some provide central parking allowing wheelchair users to access hard-to-reach areas. Facilities will almost certainly not provide accessibility facilities.

Germany

Germany

Our Accessibility Rating ★★

Access and assistance for wheelchair users and those who are less-able is widespread.

Government attitudes: Very accepting, actively working on improving accessibility and opportunities.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★★
Many public buildings, including museums and entertainment complexes, are accessible with ramps, lifts and level access, some also have assistance staff. Most local and regional tourist offices provide dedicated advice and information to wheelchair users and those with other disabilities. Berlin was awarded "European Access City of the Year” by the European Commission in 2012.

Transport ★★
Trains, trams, buses, coaches, ferries and the metro are all mostly accessible. Train stations are fully accessible. Disabled parking spaces are available in most public and private car parks.

Street Movement ★★
Historic areas of cities and medieval towns and villages can prove challenging to navigate due to cobbled and cluttered streets. However improvements are actively being made.

Attractions ★★
Most city tours are fully accessible to wheelchair users, those who are less-able and those with other disabilities. Provisions have been made to provide level access and barrier-free movement in many attractions across the country however some attractions, especially older, historic buildings or those with limited space, have yet to adapt.

Rural Travel 
Improvements are being made across the country but rural areas do fall behind when it comes to accessibility. Always check ahead.

Great Britain

Great Britain

Our Accessibility Rating ★★

Mostly well-equipped, nearly all public buildings in cities and towns are accessible. Efforts to adapt are actively being made in areas that are currently not accessible with help from charities and local government grants.

Government attitudes: Very accepting, actively working on improving accessibility and opportunities.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Equality Act 2010 which is broadly based on the EU Equal Treatments Directive. It states:

The Act protects people against discrimination, harassment or victimisation in employment, and as users of private and public services based on nine protected characteristics: age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex, and sexual orientation.

Public Buildings & Services ★★
Most buildings in major cities, whether they are modern or historic, will provide easy access to wheelchair users through the use of ramps, lifts and level flooring. All national museums and art galleries are accessible and, while standard entry is free, reduced rates are often available for temporary exhibitions for those with ID. Public spaces in cities and larger towns are easily navigable but smaller towns and villages may present problems. Tourist offices can provide useful advice to those with disabilities and, in tourist hotspots in London, Team London Volunteers (wearing either pink t-shirts or purple hi-vis vests) and patrolling police officers can provide help and directions. Disabled WCs (key required) are available in cities, larger towns, tourist hotspots and nearly all public buildings.

Transport ★★
Buses, taxis, trams, trains and boat services are mostly accessible. The London Underground is slowly improving - all stations marked with a wheelchair symbol on the tube map provide step-free access and staff are accommodating. The Equality Act 2010 requires network operators to provide access to all and improvements are being made. Even rural transport connections will usually provide wheelchair access but some very rural areas, including those in the Scottish Highlands, can sometimes be cut off and hard to access.

Street Movement ★★
Public spaces, pavements and pedestrian areas are generally easy to navigate, street furniture thoughtfully placed, dropped kerbs, tactile paving and level access all commonplace in cities and larger towns. Smaller towns, villages and rural settlements may not be quite so easy for those with wheelchairs but provisions by local charities and tourist boards are often made.

Attractions ★★
Most attractions in cities will provide easy access to all. London's West End theatres can be tricky but in most cases, staff are very helpful and accommodating. Sport venues, theme parks, historic attractions and outdoor spaces are generally well-equipped but it does depend on their location. Always check before visiting.

Rural Travel ★★
Rural towns and villages are largely accessible by car and bus and most places, even small villages, provide disabled parking spaces. Cobbled streets, high kerbs and steps can make them challenging to explore.

Other things worth mentioning
Provisions differ across the four nations although national museums, public spaces and state-operated venues tend to be uniform in their approach. Always check before travelling.

Greece

Greece

Our Accessibility Rating ★★

Although improving, much of Greece is difficult to navigate for wheelchair users and those who are less-able.

Government attitudes: Accepting, actively working on improving accessibility.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★★
Some public buildings are accessible but these are mainly in Athens. Efforts have been made on some of the larger Greek Islands to improve accessibility in public spaces but it is best to check before travelling. Public WCs are rare, most cafes or restaurants are a better option providing you make a purchase, however these WCs may be cramped.

Transport 
In Athens, all buses and taxis are wheelchair-friendly. All 60 stations across the capital's metro network are fully accessible via lift. Transport outside of the Greek capital is a little more hit and miss. Always check before travelling.

Street Movement 
Due to Greece's naturally rocky and uneven geography, movement can be challenging. In Athens, tactile paving and ramps have been installed and illegal parking in disabled car spaces is being clamped down on. Smaller cities and towns are less likely to have implemented these measures and villages are unlikely to have any measures in place. Cobbled, narrow and crowded streets make for exploring on wheels very hard.

Attractions 
The Acropolis can be reached via lift although the ground is uneven at the top. The neighbouring Acropolis Museum is also fully accessible. The Ancient Agora, the public square that was once the centre of Athenian life, is reachable via ramps and there are disabled WCs onsite. The National Archaeological Museum is also accessible via ramps and lifts and has wheelchair-friendly WCs. Other attractions, both in Athens and across the country, can vary depending on age of building and regional funding.

Rural Travel 
Rural towns and villages are largely inaccessible although some provide central parking allowing wheelchair users to access hard-to-reach areas. Local attractions will almost certainly not provide accessibility facilities.

Republic of Ireland

Republic of Ireland

Our Accessibility Rating 

All new buildings are wheelchair-friendly. In cities, most buses have low-floor access. Trains are accessible (contact in advance).

Government attitudes: Very accepting, actively working on improving accessibility and opportunities.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services 
Most buildings in major cities will provide easy access to wheelchair users through the use of ramps, lifts and level flooring. Public spaces in cities and larger towns are easily navigable but smaller towns and villages may present problems. Tourist offices can provide useful advice to those with disabilities. Disabled WCs are available in cities, larger towns, tourist hotspots and most public buildings.

Transport ★★★★
Taxis displaying the wheelchair symbol on their roof are wheelchair-friendly. Most bus services are accessible via ramps and raised pavements. Trains are accessible but only with assistance. Local authorities provide disabled parking spaces in most council-run car parks and city centres.

Street Movement ★★★
Outdoor spaces are generally easy to navigate but some areas and spaces surrounding older buildings may be challenging for those with wheelchairs. Accessible green routes available.

Attractions ★★★★
Modern buildings, naturally, always have lifts, ramps or level access but older, historic buildings are variable in the facilities they offer. Castles, abbeys and ruins are usually wheelchair-friendly but one often cannot access the whole site. More information about historic attractions can be found on Historic Ireland's website. Accessible Ireland also provides extensive lists of attractions that are suitable for wheelchair users and those who are less-abled.

Rural Travel ★★
Rural towns and villages are largely accessible by car and some places provide disabled parking spaces. Cobbled streets, high kerbs and steps can make them challenging to explore.

Italy

Italy

Our Accessibility Rating 

Not as well-equipped for wheelchair users as some of its European neighbours. Awareness is growing and museums/galleries offer reduced rates with ID.

Government attitudes: Accepting, actively working on improving accessibility.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★
While most buildings have lifts, they are rarely wide enough to accommodate wheelchairs owing to size limits in many historic buildings. Modern buildings are better equipped. Improvements to accessibility and awareness are being carried out but slowly.

Transport 
Most buses in larger cities are wheelchair-friendly but some bus stops are not so ask before boarding. Some taxies are equipped to carry wheelchair users, ask for sedia a rotelle (wheelchair). Trains in urban areas are mostly accessible with assistance. Contact operators beforehand. Disabled parking spaces can be found in most major cities but check that your blue badge is recognised. It is recommended that wheelchair-users utilise accessible private water taxis when visiting Venice, as to avoid crowded tourist transport and to catch a view of Venice that most don't get to see.

Street Movement 
Cobbled, narrow and cluttered streets, alfresco dining and steep hills make Italy a challenge for wheelchair-users. Generally older parts of cities tend to be the most challenging areas to navigate but even tarmacked areas can prove tricky due to lack of maintenance.

Attractions 
Many museums and galleries offer reduced or free entry to you and a companion if you have an obvious disability or a recognised ID. Some museums, such as Florence's Uffizi and Museo dell'Opera del Duomo, include tactile models of major artworks for visitors with impaired vision. Major attractions such as the Colosseum and the Vatican in Vatican City are also accessible via lift, ramp or level access.

Rural Travel 
Rural towns and villages are largely inaccessible. Local attractions will almost certainly not provide accessibility facilities.

Luxembourg

Luxembourg

Our Accessibility Rating 

Although hilly, Luxembourg is generally wheelchair-friendly. Buses and trams are fitted with ramps, check before using trains.

Government attitudes: Very accepting, actively working on improving accessibility and opportunities.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★
Most public buildings in Luxembourg City, whether they are modern or historic, will provide easy access to wheelchair users through the use of ramps, lifts and level flooring. Public spaces in the City are easily navigable.

Transport 
All public transport is free. Most buses and trams are wheelchair-friendly, trains are accessible with assistance (book in advance) and in Luxembourg City, disabled and less-abled people can make use of public lifts and the Pfaffenthal-Kirchberg Funicular, linking the Pfaffenthal-Kirchberg railway station with Kirchberg, Rout Bréck - Pafendall tram stop at the top of the hill.

Street Movement 
Being one of the three de facto European Union capitals means that accessibility is seen as a priority and the government of Luxembourg has invested significantly in ease of movement around the City in particular. Even in the UNESCO-listed city centre, ramps, level and flat pavements and modern pedestrian crossings have been installed. The historic quarter is the only area which may present difficulty.

Attractions 
Most major attractions, including historic buildings, in Luxembourg City are accessible to all, other more rural attractions are adapting.

Rural Travel 
Because of Luxembourg's size, its easier to implement changes across the country quicker than other larger nations. However, this doesn't mean that all rural locations are accessible. Like its European neighbours, Luxembourg's rural areas are less accessible than its urban centre but improvements are being made.

Netherlands

Netherlands

Our Accessibility Rating 

Generally very good, especially in cities. Public buildings and transport are well-equipped. WCs in restaurants can be difficult for wheelchair users.

Government attitudes: Very accepting, actively working on improving accessibility and opportunities.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★
As with much of Europe, some public buildings are old and difficult to manoeuvre however most have been retrofitted with lifts and ramps and provide wheelchair-friendly WCs. The Dutch national organisation for people with a disability is ANGO (www.ango.nl).

Transport 
Most buses and newer trams are wheelchair-friendly however not all stops provide level entry. Assistance will usually be provided to help facilitate entry and exit in this case. On public transport maps, wheelchair-friendly stations and stops are marked either by a closed circle or solid diamond icon. Some train stations have lifts, trains are usually wheelchair-accessible, most stations have a disabled WC. Some taxis are provide wheelchair access but always check.

Street Movement 
Public spaces are variable, some being cobbled and others being flat. Pavements can be cluttered and narrow in older parts, but in more modern areas, pavements and public areas have been more thoughtfully considered.

Attractions 
Most large museums and galleries have lifts or ramps and at least one disabled WC. The charity Museum4All (www.museum4all.eu) offers city-by-city listings of museums indicating their suitability for wheelchair users. Outside of cities, attractions are less likely to have level access but some may provide assistance. Ground floor attractions may sometimes include a few steps so do be aware of this and plan ahead.

Rural Travel 
Rural towns and villages are largely accessible by car and some places provide disabled parking spaces. Cobbled streets, high kerbs and steps can make them challenging to explore.

Norway

Norway

Our Accessibility Rating 

Generally well-equipped for disabled visitors, especially in cities. Public transport and street crossings are good but planning ahead is always a smart idea.

Government attitudes: Very accepting, actively working on improving accessibility and opportunities.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Equality & Anti-Discrimination Act which states:

The purpose of this Act is to promote equality and prevent discrimination on the basis of gender, pregnancy, leave in connection with childbirth or adoption, care responsibilities, ethnicity, religion, belief, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age or other significant characteristics of a person.

Public Buildings & Services ★
Generally well set up for disabled visitors with all new building required to have wheelchair access. Older buildings have begun to adapt. Some public buildings have disabled WCs. Planning is required to be able to make the most out of your visit.

Transport 
Public transport in Norway is moderately accessible but varies depending on mode and location. All buses in Oslo are step-free but trams are not. The city metro is accessible at all stations bar one. Most public ferries are wheelchair-friendly. The Flytoget high speed train service and its stations are fully accessible. Norwegian State Railway, the national train operator, offers fully accessible travel and disabled WCs at most stations.

Street Movement 
In major cities, most pedestrian crossings are equipped with either a ramp or low kerb and a audible signal. Pavements are well maintained and generally free of clutter. While parts of the country are flat, there are some hilly areas, even in cities and during the winter months, pavements can be icy.

Attractions 
A majority of attractions in Norway are accessible to all. Some activities within attractions may not be suitable. Many castles and other ruins are accessible but paths may be difficult to traverse. Theatres and royal palaces provide access and will assist where needed if you book in advance.

Rural Travel 
Norway is open to disabled visitors and has made it easy to get around. Outside of cities, towns and villages are accessible by car and some public transport methods. Rural areas will likely not provide the same level of accessibility as urban areas however.

Portugal

Portugal

Our Accessibility Rating 

Access is limited but improving. Newer public buildings are required by law to cater for wheelchair users. Accessible parking spaces are available but often occupied.

Government attitudes: Mostly accepting, laws passed on new building requirements but not actively engaging in improvement.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★
Public buildings and offices are required by law to provide access and facilities to all but private buildings are not. There is limited awareness among the public and in government of those with disabilities but, in line with the EU, anti-discrimination laws are in place.

Transport 
Buses are a mixed bag, some are accessible, others are not but there is a bus map that indicates which services and routes are wheelchair-friendly. Trams are also variable, old trams are nearly impossible to board if you are a wheelchair user and can be crowded but the more modern ones offer a wheelchair space onboard. Not all stops have step-free access and there is no map of accessible routes. The metro is partially accessible, some stations have lifts and ramps but there is no universal standard. Staff are helpful and will try to assist where possible. Taxis are a good way to get around, drivers are friendly and accommodating. Most taxis have space to store folding wheelchairs but powered wheelchairs require special services - plan in advance.

Street Movement 
Getting around in Lisbon is extremely challenging due to its hilly geography, cobbled streets and lack of maintenance. The good news is that 90% of pavements kerbs are lowered in the city. Public spaces and plazas are usually flat.

Attractions 
Fully accessible attractions are almost non-existent. Expect at least a few steps to access most attractions. That said, there are a handful of step-free attractions. Research and planning is essential.

Rural Travel 
Rural towns and villages are largely inaccessible. Local attractions will almost certainly not provide accessibility facilities.

Slovenia

Slovenia

Our Accessibility Rating

Generally well-equipped with Ljubljana leading in most areas. Public transport and buildings are fully accessible and car parks have reserved spaces.

Government attitudes: Very accepting, actively working on improving accessibility and opportunities.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★
All public buildings provide some sort of accessibility option but access is not universal. You can expect a disabled WC in most. All modern buildings are accessible with level access, ramps and lifts. Older buildings will have at least a few reserved disabled parking spaces near the entrance.

Transport 
Most buses and trains are adapted to accommodate wheelchairs. Taxis have specially adapted vehicles that are wheelchair-friendly, both for manual and motorised. Disabled parking spaces are common and one can park for unlimited time in marked spaces, or for up to two hours in unmarked spaces. Speed3x Electric wheelchairs can be hired in Ljubljana, to make travel around the capital easier. These are free of charge, contact the toursit information office for more information.

Street Movement 
Many cities in Slovenia have been adapted to make it easier for wheelchair users and those who are less-abled to get around. Pedestrian crossings are fitted with audio signals, city bus maps have braille, public telephones are fitted with audio amplifiers, lowered ATMs have been fitted, lifts give access to underpasses and pavements are dropped. Pavements are generally clear, some may be cobbled and narrow in older parts and in more rural areas.

Attractions 
Accessible attractions often pride themselves on the 'Disability Friendly' certificate which shows that the attraction has made accommodations for those with impairments, often on the advice and feedback of disabled people. Many attractions offer reduced entrance fees or free entry for disabled visitors with ID or visible disability.

Rural Travel (not sufficient information to score)
Rural facilities could be limited. Check before travelling.

Spain

Spain

Our Accessibility Rating

There is a push to improve accessibility with Barcelona leading the way. Buildings and transport in other major cities are adapting.

Government attitudes: Accepting, actively working on improving accessibility.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★
All public buildings, both modern and old, are required by law to provide access to all but in reality, this isn't always the case.

Transport 
Buses, metro, taxis and trams are mostly accessible in cities, about 70% of Madrid's metro is wheelchair-friendly and that rises to about 90% of Barcelona's metro. Valencia, Seville and Bilbao metros are modern and supposedly 100% accessible although it is worth checking beforehand. All buses are adapted to accommodate wheelchairs. Adapted taxis (Eurotaxis) can be booked using an app, calling the taxi company directly or through the tourist information office.

Street Movement 
While most of Spain's cities are flat, they are also largely historic and therefore, streets, pavements and public squares are often cobbled and uneven. As with some other European destinations, lack of maintenance is also a problem. However, many city centres are pedestrianised and legally, all public spaces should be accessible to all.

Attractions 
Barcelona is often credited with being one of the most accessible cities in Europe and many of its attractions and tourist spots are wheelchair-friendly including the UNESCO-listed Sagrada Familia. Most museums and galleries are accessible via ramps, lifts and level access and provide disabled WCs. Outside of Barcelona, access is variable. Attractions in larger cities are more likely to be easily accessed but check before visiting. Outside of urban settings, accessibility is less reliable.

Rural Travel 
Rural towns and villages are largely inaccessible. Local attractions will almost certainly not provide accessibility facilities. Check before visiting.

Other information
According to article 121 of Spain’s general road traffic regulations, a person in a wheelchair (manual or electric) is considered a pedestrian and is thus obliged to the pavement, unless there is no pavement or it is not practical to use that area. But these regulations make a special stipulation: if the pavement is not navigable, someone in a wheelchair can move on the road as long as he or she takes the proper precautions. He/she must travel carefully, as far as possible to right-hand side, and without unnecessarily impeding traffic.

Sweden

Sweden

Our Accessibility Rating

One of the best-equipped European countries for disabled visitors. Most transport, public services/buildings offer adapted facilities.

Government attitudes: Very accepting, actively working on improving accessibility and opportunities.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Accessibility Act (2019) and article 21 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which states:

Any discrimination based on any ground such as sex, race, colour, ethnic or social origin, genetic features, language, religion or belief, political or any other opinion, membership of a national minority, property, birth, disability, age or sexual orientation shall be prohibited.

Public Buildings & Services ★
As with many other European countries, most public buildings are required by law to be accessible to all and many are. Many will have a disabled WC and a lift. Modern buildings are best equipped with level access, ramps and lifts.

Transport 
Overall, public transport in Sweden is very good and is nearly completely accessible. Swedish Railways (national operator) trains are fitted with special lifts and ramps and staff are on hand to assist with prior arrangement. Metro and tram stations provide level access from platform. All buses have level access with heightened kerbs at stops in urban areas. On buses, metro, trams and national train services there are audio-visual displays showing routes and service updates.

Street Movement 
Pavements are generally smooth, with little to no obstructing street furniture. The only area which could be tricky to navigate is the old town of Gamla Stan with its cobbled streets. There is extensive use of dropped kerbs and public spaces are flat and well-maintained.

Attractions 
Tourist spots in Sweden have mostly been adapted so everyone can enjoy them. In the capital, museums and galleries are almost 100% wheelchair-friendly with lifts, level access, ramps, disabled WCs and automatic doors.

Rural Travel (not sufficient information to score)
Rural facilities could be limited. Check before travelling.

Other Information
The city is aiming to become cash-free, so always carry a debit or credit card, even to pay for smaller items such as a coffee or bus ticket.

Switzerland

Switzerland

Our Accessibility Rating

Like Sweden, Switzerland ranks highly when it comes to ease of access for the less-abled. Transport and public spaces offer adapted facilities and most walking trails are wheelchair-friendly.

Government attitudes: Very accepting, actively working on improving accessibility and opportunities.

Legal provisions: Yes - Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Disability Equality Act (2003/2017):

The purpose of the law is to prevent, reduce or eliminate discrimination suffered by persons with disabilities.

Public Buildings & Services
The capital is well-thought out in terms of accessibility. All modern buildings are accessible, with ramps, lifts, level access and disabled WCs. Older buildings are adapting and have special dispensations for disabled visitors.

Transport 
Very well equipped overall. Most train stations have mobile lifts to assist with boarding, buses have ramps or level access and dedicated space onboard. More information can be obtained from the tourist information office.

Street Movement 
A large majority of Switzerland's urban areas are flat and easily navigable. Even Bern's Old Town which is cobbled is accessible as the cobbles are flat, although it may be a little bumpy. Pavements tend to be clear and flat although in some areas, there may be steps.

Attractions 
Many historic attractions (particularly in cities) have been made accessible to wheelchair users but, perhaps understandably, areas that offer aerial views are not accessible due to steps and narrow passages. Museums and galleries are largely step-free and have disabled WCs onsite.

Rural Travel (not sufficient information to score)
Rural facilities could be limited. Check before travelling.