Wales Camping Trip: Where to Visit and How To Prepare

Wales is a naturally beautiful country, and with Covid-19 restrictions gradually being lifted and the weather becoming warmer, it's an ideal time to go there for a holiday. With stunning scenery, a rich history and natural wildlife, the best way to take it all in is to go camping right in the middle of it. Camping is a versatile option, allowing you to see all of Wales.

It'll enable you to enjoy visiting the many villages and towns, as well as their attractions. You'll also be able to sleep under the stars, making this a trip you'll never forget. So, if you're considering camping in Wales, here are some suggestions about where to visit and how to prepare.

Preparing for Camping

Perhaps the first thing you should do is plan your trip; know where you're going, know what you're doing and know what the weather is likely to be. However, as you know, the temperature in the UK is unpredictable at the best of times, so packing a few jumpers, tracksuits, wellies, and an umbrella, along with clothes for warmer weather, will ensure you have appropriate clothing if the weather suddenly changes.

Rooftop Tent from Roofbunk
Rooftop Tent from Roofbunk

Having a few blankets and pillows, along with a sleeping bag and, obviously, a tent, will cover your sleeping arrangements. Or maybe your first option, if sleeping in a tent isn't for you, is a roof-bunk. You can check them out here. Attached to the roof of your vehicle, it's an ideal alternative to a tent as you're still camping outside, albeit not in the traditional sense.

You'll also want to have a first aid kit, torch, batteries, charger, and toiletries, outdoor cooking equipment, as well as some food and drinks. Perhaps even things to keep you entertained, like playing cards or books. Keep an eye out for where you can purchase food and drink if your campsite doesn't sell them.

Places to Visit

Brecon Beacons National Park (Parc Cenedlaethol Bannau Brycheiniog)

Brecon Beacons National Park
Brecon Beacons National Park

The Beacons got their name from the red sandstone that resembles the beacons of light used to warn people of invaders. This beautiful place is sandwiched between the Black Mountains of Waun Fach in the East and Fan Brycheiniog in the West, with peaks higher than 2,000 feet.

The east side of the Beacons is home to Welsh Mountain Ponies. They're known for being wild, although they're still used for pulling things, like carts locally. They've been around since Roman times and are indeed a sight to behold in their natural habitat. On the other side of the Beacons, in the west, is the river Usk.

There are many caves and waterfalls to explore, including the Henrhyd Falls. But it's an ideal place for camping, fishing, mountain biking and climbing, horse riding and sailing.

Cardiff Castle and the National Museum Cardiff

Cardiff Castle
Cardiff Castle

Amazingly, Cardiff Castle has part of its original build still intact some 1,000 years after being built, making it a must-see place to visit when you're in Wales.

Take a look at the Castle's magnificent State Apartments so that you can find out about life in the Castle during different times in history. View the medieval murals and impressive fireplace, amongst other things. Cardiff Castle will genuinely be a treat for your eyes and will be something you won't forget seeing.

You can also visit the National Museum Cardiff, which has plenty of fascinating collections on all manner of subjects, including the arts and zoology. Not only is it free, but it is also home to the National Museum of Art, where you can see works by a range of influential artists.

Mumbles

Mumbles
Mumbles

Just a few miles out from Swansea is Mumbles, a small but vibrant coastal town. From Swansea Bay waterfront, you're able to see a panoramic view of the distant city as well as Mumble's Lighthouse and cliff tops.

There's an attractive promenade that's been recently updated, full of shops or restaurants for you to occupy yourself if you want a break from walking along the coast, taking in the beautiful views. You're able to treat yourself to an expensive meal or even prepare a picnic for a romantic dinner in a secluded spot.

Snowdonia National Park (Parc Cenedlaethol Eryri)

Snowdonia National Park
Snowdonia National Park

Located in the county of Gwynedd are picturesque mountains and hills of Snowdonia, which consists of over a dozen peaks, most over 3,000 feet high. This place is better known in Welsh as Eryri, with the most famous mountain of Snowdon being just over 3,500 feet tall. Access the summit on foot or by train.

Snowdon is so popular that it's one of the most visited sites in the UK, with around 4 million visitors per year! If you make it to its summit, you can see Bala Lake to the coast on a clear day, which is truly breathtaking.

Additionally, Snowdonia National Park is a popular destination, thanks to its hiking trails, of which there are just under 1,500. Along with hiking, other popular activities include mountain climbing and cycling.

Tenby

Tenby
Tenby

Surrounded by award-winning sandy beaches, Tenby is a Pembrokeshire town, which is steeped in history. Unbelievably, the medieval castle walls built to protect the town from the Welsh rebellion are still standing today. Other places of historical value include Wale's oldest independent museum, the Tenby Museum and Art Gallery, and the Tudor Merchant's House, a National Trust Building.

For those of you that like a drink, the Tenby Harbour Brewery is a must-visit place. Home in a converted 18th-century warehouse, you can arrange to have a tour around it, as well as have tasting sessions. Their beers can be found in local pubs for you to enjoy whilst taking in the town's atmosphere.

If you feel like an adventure, you can get lost amongst the cobbled roads and enjoy the delights in each one. Alternatively, you can take a short boat ride to Caldey Island to visit its Cistercian Monks, who are infamous for their home-grown soaps and perfumes that are made from the island's herbs. You may even spot some of the local wildlife, perfect if you're a nature lover.

Knowing where you're planning to go allows you to prepare what you need, ensuring you have all the necessities you need. Doing this takes a lot of stress away, leaving you to enjoy your holiday. With how the last couple of years have been, you're entitled to enjoy some rest and recovery, either by yourself or with your loved ones. Camping in Wales is a great way to do this, away from the confines of being inside and outside, appreciating the picturesque natural beauty that Wales has to offer. It's a priceless experience that you'll never forget and will want to repeat, and who can blame you?